Arrow Paradox

In any instant, a moving object is indistinguishable from a non-moving object: Thus motion is impossible.

This is called the arrow paradox, and it’s another of Zeno’s arguments against motion. The issue here is that, in a single instant of time, zero seconds pass, and so zero motion happens. Zeno argued that if time were made up of instants, the fact that motion doesn’t happen in any particular instant would mean motion doesn’t happen.

As with the dichotomy paradox, the arrow paradox actually hints at modern understandings of quantum mechanics. In his book "Reflections on Relativity,
" Kevin Brown notes that, in the context of special relativity, an object in motion is different from an object at rest: Relativity requires that objects moving at different speeds will appear different to outside observers and will themselves have different perceptions of the world around them.

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